The 2020 Sundance Film Festival held it’s award ceremony on February 1st, after a ten day exhibition that featured over 100 independent films. This is one of the most anticipated and exciting film events held in Utah each year.

This was a big year for Sundance, with major public figures including Taylor Swift, Hillary Clinton, and Lin-Manuela Miranda joining the scene. The awards ceremony was marked by the announcement that Tabitha Jackson would be taking over John Cooper’s role as director of the festival, the first female director in Sundance history. The festival received a record high of 15,100 submissions and hosted the most diverse lineup of films and talent yet.

This event is a chance for aspiring indie filmmakers to showcase their work and launch their careers. Recognized as the mecca for discovering breakout documentaries, it’s an authentic opportunity for independent storytellers to come together and share the ideas that are inspiring and shaping cinema today. 

Sundance Film Festival, Park City Utah; Photo from Flickr

Here are the most memorable films from the festival that you should keep an eye out for in 2020:

The winners of the Four Grand Jury Prizes include Minari, Boys State, Epicentro, and Yalda, A Night For Forgiveness. Minari won two of the highest honors, the U.S Dramatic Prize award and the Audience U.S. Dramatic award. This autobiography tells the heart-wrenching story of a Korean immigrant family struggling to adjust to rural Arkansas and live the American dream. The film was secured and funded by A24 prior to Sundance, and was among the most well-reviewed entries this year.

Boys State won the U.S. Documentary Prize, another honorable film bought by A24 and Apple for a record-breaking $12 million. This coming-of-age documentary follows a group of Texas high school boys who attend politics camp and create their own mock government over the summer. The premier struck a chord with viewers because it gives a first-hand look into the cut-throat nature behind American politics and the struggle for these teens to come together, rather than let their views divide them. An entertaining yet emotional parallel of the challenges our country faces today, this film shouldn’t be missed.

Audience-Voted Awards went to Minari, Crip Camp, The Reason I Jump, Identifying Features, and I Carry You With Me. The Festival Favorite Award went to Giving Voice, which follows six high school students competing in the August Wilson Monologue Competition in New York City. Other notable premiers included The 40 Year Old Version, Kajillionaire, The Killing of Two Lovers, Palm Springs, Shirley, Zola, and Time. What movies are you excited to see from the festival?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s